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Shoulder Surgery in India | Cost of Shoulder Surgery in India

Shoulder Surgery in India

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Shoulder Surgery in India:

Our shoulder is one of the extensively used joint in our body and it also is complex due to its 360 degree mobility function. Unlike our knee or ankle joint, our shoulder joint is used for multiple functions. A patient may need shoulder replacement surgery or arthroscopy intervention due to damage caused by wear and tear or trauma or osteoarthritis.  Let us learn about types shoulder surgery performed in India. We will learn the cost and other useful information about Shoulder surgery.

Shoulder Replacement Surgery:

Shoulder pain may involve the cartilage, ligaments, muscles, nerves, or tendons. It can also include the shoulder blade, neck and arm. Some conditions that may require shoulder surgery include severe shoulder arthritis, rotator cuff tears and frozen shoulder. In case of a shoulder injury then a shoulder replacement may be the best option. During this procedure, both sides of the ball-and-socket shoulder joint are replaced with artificial parts. Other surgical shoulder procedures may include fixation of fractures, repair of tears and removal of bone spurs.

What is a Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery?

Total shoulder replacement is a complex procedure that involves replacing the shoulder joint with artificial parts. The procedure is performed to relieve pain and improve mobility.

Shoulder replacement surgery is usually recommended for people who have severe pain in their shoulder, some conditions are as below:

  • This type of arthritis is common in older people. It occurs when the cartilage that pads bones wears away.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With RA, your immune system mistakenly attacks your joints, causing pain and inflammation.
  • Avascular necrosis. This condition happens when loss of blood to a bone occurs. It can cause damage and pain in the shoulder joint.
  • A broken shoulder. If you badly break your shoulder bone, you might need a shoulder replacement to repair it.

What happens during a Total Shoulder Replacement Surgery?

Shoulder replacement surgery generally takes about two hours. During the surgery, doctors replace the damaged joint “ball,” known as the humeral head, of the shoulder with a metal ball. They also place a plastic surface on the “socket” of the shoulder, known as the glenoid. Sometimes, a partial shoulder replacement can be performed. This involves replacing only the ball of the joint.

Expected outcome of a Total shoulder replacement Surgery:

Shoulder replacement surgery is a major operation, so you’ll likely experience pain during your recovery. Rehabilitation is started right away, usually on the day of surgery. You should be prepared to have less arm function for about a month after surgery. You’ll need to be careful not to lift any objects. You should also avoid activities that require pushing or pulling. In general, most people are able to resume gentle daily living activities within two to six weeks.

What are the risks of a Total shoulder replacement surgery?

Some of these risks may be higher in people having a repeat surgery. Your own risks may vary depending on the anatomy of your shoulder problem.

  • Damage to the surrounding nerves (which might impair arm movement)
  • rotator cuff tear
  • Fracture of one of the shoulder bones
  • Dislocation of the artificial joint
  • Infection

Before having any surgery, speak with your surgeon about the risks and benefits of the procedure and the results you can expect. Take your time to make an informed choice. It is important to fully understand what is required in your post-surgical rehabilitation.

What is a reverse total shoulder replacement?

During reverse total shoulder replacement procedure, both sides of the ball-and-socket shoulder joint are replaced with artificial parts.

A normal function of a shoulder – The shoulder joint is made up of the upper arm bone (humerus) and the shoulder blade (scapula). The rounded end of the upper arm bone moves inside a shallow socket in the shoulder blade. Because of this, your shoulder normally has a very wide range of motion. Cartilage, tendon, and ligaments around the joint also provide support and help the joint move smoothly.

In a reverse total shoulder replacement, a surgeon removes the rounded head of the upper arm bone. Using screws and special tools, he or she attaches a plastic socket to the remaining bone. The surgeon also removes part of the socket of the shoulder blade. This is then replaced with a metal ball. The metal ball can then move around inside the socket that attaches to the upper arm bone.

Why might I need a reverse total shoulder replacement?

Surgery may be an option for you if you have severe pain that gets in the way of everyday activities. Most people get a standard total shoulder replacement. However, reverse total shoulder replacement works better for people with certain injuries, including some rotator cuff injuries. If you have this type of injury, a standard shoulder replacement still might leave you with some pain and limited movement. A reverse total shoulder replacement usually improves these problems. After surgery, instead of using the rotator cuff to lift up your arm, you can use your deltoid muscle. This is a muscle that helps lift the arm up and away from the body.

What happens during a reverse total shoulder replacement?

An orthopaedic surgeon will make a cut through the skin near the top of your shoulder. He or she will also need to cut through the layer of muscle beneath. The surgeon will remove the damaged section of the humerus and the scapula. Using special screws, he or she will attach the metal ball to your scapula and the plastic socket to the top of the upper arm bone. The surgeon may place a tube to drain extra fluid in the joint. This tube will be taken out later.

Expected outcome of a reverse total shoulder replacement:

You will have some pain as you heal after the surgery. But your original shoulder pain should be improved. Your arm will probably be in a sling after the surgery for several weeks. You will probably begin physical therapy exercises while you are still in the hospital. You will probably need to stay in the hospital for 2 to 3 days. You won’t be able to use your arm for several weeks, though. Most people can return to light work within a few weeks.

What are the risks of a reverse total shoulder replacement?

Some of these risks may be higher in people having a repeat surgery. Your own risks may vary depending on the anatomy of your shoulder problem.

  • Infection
  • Damage to the surrounding nerves (which might impair arm movement)
  • Fracture of one of the shoulder bones
  • Dislocation of the artificial joint
  • rotator cuff tear

Before having any surgery, speak with your surgeon about the risks and benefits of the procedure and the results you can expect. Take your time to make an informed choice. It is important to fully understand what is required in your post-surgical rehabilitation.

What is a Shoulder Arthroscopy?

An arthroscope is a small tube that is inserted into the body. It contains a system of lenses, a small video camera, and a light for viewing. The camera is connected to a monitoring system that lets a surgeon view the surgery while it is being done. The arthroscope is often used with other tools that are inserted through another cut or incision. These tools are used for grasping, cutting, and probing.

What are the causes of a Shoulder Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy for Impingement

Shoulder impingement is a common cause of shoulder pain. This is a condition in which the tendons of your rotator cuff are intermittently trapped and compressed during movement. The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that attach your upper arm bone to your shoulder. This causes progressive damage to the tendons. Impingement syndrome can also be described as rotator cuff tendonitis and bursitis.

The arthroscopic procedure used to correct impingement is known as a subacromial decompression. The aim of the surgery is to increase the space between the rotator cuff and the top of the shoulder (known as the acromion).

Arthroscopic SLAP Repair

A SLAP tear is an injury to the rim of cartilage that encircles the shoulder socket (known as the labrum). Arthroscopic surgery may be used to restore the shoulder socket back to its position. If the damage extends into the biceps tendon, additional surgery may be needed.

Arthroscopy for Shoulder Dislocation

A shoulder dislocation injury occurs when the ball of the shoulder joint comes out of the socket. A type of surgery known as a Bankart repair can help in this case. Other cases involved generalized laxity of the shoulder ligaments which can lead to a condition known as multidirectional instability. This can cause the shoulder joint to come in and out of the socket very easily. Surgery would be used to tighten the joint capsule. Repeated dislocations can lead to severe shoulder damage and require substantial surgery to keep the joint in place. The procedures typically involve repositioning bone around the shoulder.

Arthroscopy for Frozen Shoulder

When a frozen shoulder occurs, the capsule surrounding the shoulder joint becomes tight and contracted. The goal of surgery is to loosen the contracted tissue to allow the shoulder to move more freely. This is typically done by cutting the capsule all the way around the socket of the shoulder. Aggressive physical therapy is essential to restoring the shoulder’s full range of motion.

What happens during a Shoulder Arthroscopy?

A small incision is made in your skin. The arthroscope is inserted through the incision. Other incisions may be made to insert surgical tools as needed for the joint repair. Light is transmitted via fiber optics at the end of the arthroscope. Corrective surgery, if needed, may be done during the initial diagnostic procedure.

Expected outcome of Shoulder Arthroscopy:

Recovery time varies. Some people get back to their normal activity in a few days or weeks. You’ll likely be able to drive again in one to three weeks.

What are the risks of a Shoulder Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy is a very safe procedure and complications are uncommon. Problems may include:

  • Damage to the surrounding nerves (which might impair arm movement)
  • Infection. Any type of invasive surgery carries a risk of infection.
  • Blood clots. Rarely, procedures that last longer than an hour can increase the risk of blood clots developing in your legs or lungs.

Before having any surgery, speak with your surgeon about the risks and benefits of the procedure and the results you can expect. Take your time to make an informed choice. It is important to fully understand what is required in your post-surgical rehabilitation.

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